Masterpieces from Matisse in South Africa

This year’s National Arts Festival may have come to an end but you can still get your art fix at the Standard Bank Gallery in Johannesburg. A large number of works by Henri Matisse will be on display for all to enjoy, thanks to support from the Embassy of France to South Africa. This is the first wide-ranging…

Providing healthcare and humanity

Following discussions on migration, the plight of refugees and the challenges that people face as a result of xenophobia, Sharon Ekambaram, founding director of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) South Africa, highlighted the urgent need for recognition, support and funding. With deep sensitivity and consideration for those most in need, MSF are helping refugees gain access to…

One great novel, six original scripts

Originally published by Cue Yasthiel Devraj, Cue student reporter NoViolet Bulawayo’s debut novel, We Need New Names, forms the springboard for Twist Theatre Development Project’s 2016 novel-script project. The annual exercise calls for six writers of diverse backgrounds – this year hailing from Zambia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, and Mozambique – to craft a ten-minute script…

Let’s talk production: Twijnstra and Durden tackle theatre in new book

By Carol Kagezi Entering the theatre industry is seemingly difficult, especially in South Africa. In their first book, Theatre Directing in South Africa, Durban based Dutch theatre director Roel Twijnstra and theatre specialist Emma Durden offer practical steps one can take when embarking on such a journey. Based on the popularity of this book, the…

The future of the past is a must see

Carol Kagezi Originally posted on Artslink Often find yourself reaching out for your phone or logging on to any social media you may own? If not, then this is your cup of tea. If you are still reading this and you happen to be at the National Arts’ Festival, the show Not the Futurists is…

We need more names – the limitations of African Literature

The increasing interest in African Literature and the recognition of African authors globally is a cause for celebration. Yet the increase in visibility is not without its problems. “This newfound visibility has prompted a renewed sense of contestation around the term, a renewed sense of debate and conversation about what exactly we mean, what are…

Satire, cartoons and drawing our own limits

One of the recurring issues when talking satire and freedom of expression at Think!Fest has been the limit to which we can say what we want. With Pierre de Vos, Justice Albie Sachs, Tara Notcutt, Jeremy Nell and Tjeerd Royaards on the panel and a full house ready to talk satire, chair Anthea Garman begins…

The state of the state: where are we now and how do we go forward?

The State of the State debate brought together Noor Nieftagodien, Ivor Chipkin and Ashley Westaway to discuss the current state of South Africa. While all three speakers had previously shared their work and research about local politics to Think!Fest audiences, the debate allowed them to discuss ideas and compare thoughts on where we stand as…

Understanding change in local states through the lens of history

Professor Noor Nieftagodien’s work is centred on local histories and how it affects the present realities of South African citizens. While being deeply political, he attempts to comprehend a set of problems through a historical lens, looking at how state practices of the past have shaped how we are today. Nieftagodien takes us through a…

Failure of Eastern Cape education, but on whose part?

Ashley Westaway is the Manager of GADRA education, an organisation which aims to provide educational services and transformation of the education system in Grahamstown. In speaking about the state of schools in the Eastern Cape, he presents us with a story of failure. Whether the failure lies with the students or the system is what we…

New stories changing the way we think about how the state works

The stories that are told about South Africa speak of corruption and decline of the state. We keep talking of an impending crisis, as if disaster is predicted by something intrinsic to our character as a country. We keep telling these stories over and over, but in order to understand things, we need to take…

Protecting ourselves against cyber surveillance

Gavin MacFadyen has long been involved in work related to online information and cyber surveillance, despite not being a ‘nerd’, as he jokingly refers to those more technologically advanced. He recalls the days when data gathered from computers was denounced by journalists as irrelevant techno speak. Fast forward a few years and data has now…